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There is an assortment of tools that a home inspector carries and I have an interesting assortment. Aside from the typical items, a flashlight, multi-bit screwdriver, outlet tester, my favorite is the mini-sledge hammer (just kidding!!) I will use a Bore Scope, thermal imaging camera and or a thermal moisture meter. I don’t use these tools to be fancy or to be a show-off. And I don’t pull these out just for giggles - I have to have a good reason before incorporating these into the inspection. It is important to understand when incorporating such tools, time is added to the inspection and writing of the report. Another little item I carry is a spray bottle with light soap mixture. This is actually the best tool to use to document a suspected gas leak at a valve or joint. 
As of 2016 I have incorporated a tool that has proved to be of great value. A drone. A home inspector is not required to physically access a roof if that roof is deemed too steep, too high, too old, or even too new. If the inspector decides that any of the previous reasons fit, then they stay on the ground - thus limiting the inspection of the home. But the inspector must state why they did not access the roof and how if at all inspected it. This is why I use a drone - I don’t have to worry about falling from a roof, or damaging shingles. It enables me to provide my client with a complete inspection without potentially damaging shingles or injury to myself. And there is no additional fee for using the drone. But like anything else, there are limitations. Rain, fog, too many tree’s, power lines, being too windy, proximity to airports and military bases.
I have added something new to this - yes … a little marketing through Amazon -