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Paul’s Home Inspection LHI #10813 / Ph: 318-820-1187
Exceeding the minimum in Home Inspections
Dryer Venting: It’s not something that is at the top of most people’s list.  But is should be.  Dryer lint is combustible – it can flame up without any human interaction in the right conditions.  The other issue with dryer lint is when it builds up in the vent duct or starts to block the damper at the exterior it takes longer for clothes to dry … that equates to running the dryer longer = larger utility bill = more stress on the appliance = repair / replacement sooner than later. There are a few things to look for with laundry rooms – is the dryer duct clear? Does it exit to the exterior wall or roof?  Is the damper (vent hood) at the exterior wall clear? Is there a screen?  If the duct is running to the attic – is foil flex, semirigid or dryerflex used?   (Dryerflex is a new product coming to market, UL 2158A, dryerflex.com). If the duct is rigid, how are the joints secured? Taped, screwed?  Are they even connected? Is there a gas supply line?  Is the gas line capped or is there a valve? Is the valve end capped? Is the duct run correct? The maximum run is thirty-five (35) feet and for each standard elbow there is a five (5) foot decrease / penalty.   To answer those questions above: Dryer vents should be inspected / cleaned on a regular basis, Dampers aka dryer vent hood at the exterior wall should NOT have any screens – a flapper door or louvers is   recommended. Foil flex should never be used as primary duct – only from dryer to duct connection. Dryer duct should never have screws, as screws can catch dryer lint and begin blockage of duct.  Foil tape is typically   used.   Gas lines / valve should always have a cap when not in use.  Joints should be checked for leakage periodically. Long runs in duct can cause dryer lint to fall back, creating obstruction to duct.  
Paul’s Home Inspection LHI #10813 / Ph: 318-820-1187